CHRISTIAN CRIME



WHAT ABOUT CHRISTIAN CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY? 


Jan Hus (1369 – 6 July 1415)
Often referred to in English as John Hus or John Huss, was a Czech priest, philosopher, reformer, and master at Charles University in Prague. Hus is considered the first Church reformer, as he lived before Luther, Calvin, and Zwingli.

He was burned at the stake for heresy against the doctrines of the Catholic Church, including those on ecclesiology, the Eucharist, and other theological topics. Hus was a key predecessor to the Protestant movement of the sixteenth century, and his teachings had a strong influence on the states of Europe, most immediately in the approval of a reformist Bohemian religious denomination, and, more than a century later, on Martin Luther.


Girolamo Savonarola, 1452-1498
The Italian religious and political reformer, entered the Dominican order at Bologna. In a convent at Brescia his zeal won attention, and in 1489 he was recalled to Florence. His second appearance in the pulpit of San Marco -- on the sinfulness and apostasy of the time -- was a great popular triumph, and by some he was hailed as an inspired prophet.

To the adherents of the Medici therefore, Savonarola early became an object of suspicion but till the death of Lorenzo in 1492, his relations with the Church were at least not antagonistic and when, in 1493, a reform of the Dominican order in Tuscany was proposed under his auspices, it was approved by the pope, and Savonarola was named the first vicar-general but now his preaching began to point plainly to a political revolution as the divinely-ordained means for the regeneration of religion and morality.

His gift of prophecy led to his being cited in 1495 to answer a charge of heresy at Rome and on his failing to appear he was forbidden to preach. In 1497 came a sentence of excommunication from Rome;  He was brought to trial for falsely claiming to have seen visions, and uttered prophecies, for religious error, and for sedition. 

Under torture he made avowals, which he afterwards withdrew. He was declared guilty, the sentence confirmed by Rome. On May 23, 1498, this extraordinary man and two Dominican disciples were hanged and burned, still professing their adherence to the Church.


Galileo Galilei  15 Feb.1564 - 8 Jan.1642
Was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who played a major role in the Scientific Revolution. His achievements include improvements to the telescope, incredible astronomical observations and support for Copernican’s theory.  That the sun is the center of the Universe and not the earth.  Galileo has been called the "father of modern observational astronomy, modern physics", and "the Father of Modern Science".

His contributions include the confirmation of the phases of Venus, the discovery of the four largest satellites of Jupiter and the observation and analysis of sunspots. Galileo also worked in applied science and technology, inventing an improved military compass and other instruments.

Galileo's championing of heliocentrism ( another form of Copernicans theory) was controversial within his lifetime, The matter was investigated by the Roman Inquisition in 1615, and they concluded that it could be supported as only a possibility, not an established fact.

Galileo later defended his views in Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, which appeared to attack Pope Urban VIII and thus alienated him and the Jesuits, who had both supported Galileo up until this point. He was tried by the Inquisition, found "vehemently suspect of heresy", forced to recant, and spent the rest of his life under house arrest

It was while Galileo was under house arrest that he wrote one of his finest works, Two New Sciences, in which he summarized the work he had done some forty years earlier, on the two sciences now called kinematics and strength of materials.

 

Michael Servetus  29 Sept 1509 or 1511 – 27 Oct 1553
Was a Spanish theologian, physician, cartographer, and Renaissance humanist. He was the first European to correctly describe the function of pulmonary circulation. He was a polymath versed in many sciences: mathematics, astronomy and meteorology, geography, human anatomy, medicine and pharmacology, as well as jurisprudence, translation, poetry and the scholarly study of the Bible in its original languages.

He is renowned in the history of several of these fields, particularly medicine and theology. He participated in the Protestant Reformation, and later developed a non-Trinitarian Christology. Condemned by Catholics and Protestants alike, he was arrested in Geneva and burnt at the stake as a heretic by order of the Protestant Geneva governing council.

Calvin believed Servetus deserving of death on account of what he termed as his "execrable blasphemies". Calvin expressed these sentiments in a letter to Farel, written about a week after Servetus’ arrest, in which he also mentioned an exchange with Servetus. Calvin wrote:

...after Servetus had been recognized, I thought he should be detained. My friend Nicolas summoned him on a capital charge, offering himself as a security according to the lex talionis. On the following day he adduced against him forty written charges. He at first sought to evade them. Accordingly we were summoned. 

He impudently reviled me, just as if he regarded me as obnoxious to him. I answered him as he deserved... of the man’s effrontery I will say nothing; but such was his madness that he did not hesitate to say that devils possessed divinity; yea, that many gods were in individual devils, inasmuch as a deity had been substantially communicated to those equally with wood and stone. I hope that sentence of death will at least be passed on him; but I desired that the severity of the punishment be mitigated.

As Servetus was not a citizen of Geneva, and legally could at worst be banished, the government, in an attempt to find some plausible excuse to disregard this legal reality, had consulted with other Swiss Reformed cantons (Zürich, Bern, Basel, Schaffhausen.)  They universally favored his condemnation and suppression of his doctrine, but without saying how that should be accomplished.  Martin Luther had condemned his writing in strong terms. Servetus and Philip Melanchthon had strongly hostile views of each other. 

The party called the "Libertines", who were generally opposed to anything and everything John Calvin supported, were in this case strongly in favour of the execution of Servetus at the stake (while Calvin urged that he be beheaded instead).  In fact, the council that condemned Servetus was presided over by Perrin, a Libertine who ultimately on 24 October sentenced Servetus to death by burning for denying the Trinity and infant baptism.

When Calvin requested that Servetus be executed by decapitation as a traitor rather than by fire as a heretic, Farel, in a letter of 8 September, chided him for undue lenience.  The Geneva Council refused his request. On 27 October 1553 Servetus was burned at the stake just outside Geneva with what was believed to be the last copy of his book chained to his leg. Historians record his last words as: "Jesus, Son of the Eternal God, have mercy on me.

ADDING TO THE ABOVE

  • The stories of the massacres of the Saxons, Waldensians, and Albigenses.
  • The atrocities against Mohammedans and Jews during the Crusades, that cost the lives of five millions of human beings.
  • The story of the Inquisition, which, during the five hundred years of its accursed existence, gorged itself on the heart's blood of hundreds of thousands of Christians as well as Jews.
  • The story of the St. Bartholomew-night massacre, that cost the lives of fifty thousand human beings, and in honor of which Pope Gregory XIII went in solemn state to church to render thanksgiving, and had a coin struck, and proclaimed that year a Year of Jubilee.
  • The story of the imprisoning and scourging and torturing and drowning and hanging of innocent women as witches, and of harmless Quakers as devils.
  • What if the Christians were in the great minority, and the Jews, in overwhelming majority, were constantly to preach and teach and enact  these authenticated historical occurrences.


Something about casting stones….


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